Category Archives: Events – Recent

Students shut down PSU Board of Trustees meeting, demand $15 Now for all campus workers

by Justin Norton-Kertson

The Portland State University Board of Trustees received an ear-full from a crowd of dozens of students, campus workers, professors, and community members who packed today’s board meeting, and who are fed up with being ignored by university administration and leadership. The day’s action comes after years of being ignored, and was an escalation of a year of direct action by the Portland State University Student union (PSUSU) over the arming of campus security and a host of other issues.

PSU President Wim Weiwel with other members of the PSU Board of Trustees.
PSU President Wim Weiwel (center) with other members of the PSU Board of Trustees.

The day’s action also comes just weeks after the president of the Associated Students of PSU, Dana Gazi, issued a statement calling for a mass student movement. That statement mirrored many of the demands that have been made by PSUSU such as disarming campus police, free college tuition, cancelation of student debt, a living wage for all campus workers, and an end to business model higher education.  Gazi spoke at today’s meeting echoing much of the sentiment in their open letter.

Students spoke at the meeting about racism, Islamophobia, and a growing concern about open white supremacy on campus,  as well the arming of campus security, poverty wages paid on campus, student hunger and houselessness, the cutting of arts programs, bloated administrative salaries and perks, and a host of other issues that the board has all but ignored student voices on for years.  Continue reading Students shut down PSU Board of Trustees meeting, demand $15 Now for all campus workers

15 Now PDX Disrupts, Walks Out of Minimum Wage Hearing

by Justin Norton-Kertson

On Monday dozens of supporters of a statewide $15 minimum wage marched through the state capitol building. They spent the morning going from office to office in large groups, talking to legislators and their staff about the importance of a statewide $15 minimum wage, and the importance of repealing the anti-worker, ALEC inspired preemption law that helps keep wages below the cost of living by preventing cities and counties from raising the minimum wage above the state level.

That afternoon, the Senate Workforce Committee held an informational hearing on raising Oregon’s minimum wage at which only one affected low-wage worker was given space to speak. The committee was greeted by a room full of low-wage workers and supporters in red 15 Now shirts. With about 40 15 Now supporters at the hearing, their presence dominated the room. At one point, all the $15 supporters were asked to stand to show their support, almost everyone in the room stood up except for the few business interests present.

Legislators heard about the various minimum wage campaigns and ballot initiatives underway, and also heard from business owners and others who support raising the minimum wage. A few business owners and lobbyists came to speak against raising the minimum wage.

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Speaking about the campaign to raise the statewide minimum wage to $15 per hour, Justin Norton-Kertson expressed skepticism that Democrats can come together and do the right thing for Oregon’s low-wage workers and their families. Republican state senator Knopp, illustrating Republican disdain for working class issues, stood up and walked out of the room in the middle of Norton-Kertson’s presentation.

“We did this back in April…and we all know how that turned out. Nothing, right? And we all know that the issue isn’t about Republicans versus Democrats. Democrats have majorities in both houses…it’s Democrats who can’t agree among themselves. So I’m left wondering what the point of this is. Why should we believe that this session, which is only a month long, will be any different than last session. And if we were to get any minimum wage increase what would the compromise be? Would it be high enough for places like Portland, Eugene, Hood River, Bend, Corvallis, and Ashland? Would it leave out farmworkers or bring in a tip credit?”

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Norton-Kertson also said that their lack of faith in Democrats is why a $15 ballot initiative was filed so early, and that if lawmakers won’t do the right thing, that they should at least refer both $15 and the repeal of Oregon’s minimum wage preemption law to the ballot so that voters can decide and do the right thing themselves.

Immediately after he finished speaking, 15 Now supporters stood up and mic checked the hearing, reiterating the call for a statewide $15 and the restoration of local control of minimum wage laws. In a call and response pattern, they asked why low-wage workers weren’t invited to speak at the hearing. They read off a long list of job types and industries in Oregon that pay less than $15 per hour, and then walked out of the hearing en masse chanting “$15 now and local control!”

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Because Black Lives Matter! $15 NOW!
For homecare workers! $15 NOW!
For childcare workers! $15 NOW!
For janitors! $15 NOW!
For single mothers! $15 NOW!
For food service workers! $15 NOW!
For security guards! $15 NOW!
For nursing home workers! $15 NOW!
For retail workers! $15 NOW!
For rural Oregon $15 NOW!
For college campus workers! $15 NOW!
For city workers! $15 NOW!
For social workers! $15 NOW!
For farm workers! $15 NOW!
For farm workers! $15 NOW!

Click Here to view the video stream of the hearing and the mic check.

Portland Rally Demands $15 and Union for Janitors, Homecare Workers

by Justin Norton-Kertson

In Portland hundreds of people marched and rallied for $15 and a union, as part of the national day of action that brought thousands of striking fast food workers into the streets in 270 cities across the country.  As many as 700 additional cities planned protests that supported low-wage workers in other industries.  

No fast food workers struck in Portland, but janitors and homecare workers raised their voices to demand a $15 wage, supported by the Portland Area Campaign for $15, a coalition made up of Portland Jobs With Justice, 15 Now PDX, SEIU 49, Laborers 483, AFSCME and others.

Nov10_2Home care worker Christine Pekert spoke at the rally, and when asked why she was fighting for a $15 wage she said, “I’ve been a home care worker for years, and I can remember days when I had to gather cans and bottles to buy gas to get to work. I need $15 and I’m here to support others demanding $15 too.”

At the Dia de los Muertos themed rally, workers and their supporters marched around the Pittock Building chanting “We work, we sweat, put $15 on the check!” to bring in good jobs with living wages. Earlier this year, the Pittock Building switched from union janitors to a low paying janitorial company, MBS, but the janitors and their allies are fighting back. The Pittock Building was also a focal point for $15 and a union protests earlier this year.

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Also at the rally were activists working towards a statewide minimum wage of $15, an effort supported by dozens of labor unions and community groups.

Jamie Partridge, a volunteer for 15 Now PDX and chief petitioner for the Oregonians for 15 statewide ballot measure, talked about the importance of labor unions supporting the Fight for $15:

“Labor unions are under direct attack across the country, and their support of a $15 minimum wage has the potential to attract the support of millions of workers whose lives would be drastically improved with a $15 wage and union rights.”

Partridge is one of hundreds of volunteers across the state gathering signatures to put the $15 minimum wage on the Oregon ballot in 2016. A competing ballot initiative for $13.50 was recently filed by some Oregon unions with the Raise the Wage coalition.

Nov10_4The Fight for $15 has spread throughout low-wage America to such an extent that national politics have been affected.  Democratic Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders added the $15 minimum wage to his campaign platform.  In support of the national day of action for $15 Sanders said:

“i stand with the thousands of workers on strike today to demand $15 and a union.  In the year 2015, a job has got to lift workers out of poverty, not keep them in it.”

15 Now supporters are also demanding that state lawmakers end the statewide preemption law that prohibits cities from raising their own minimum wage, so that local initiatives in Portland, Eugene, and elsewhere can be directly presented to and passed by voters.

PSU Student Union, 15 Now Activists “Mic Check” Televised Minimum Wage Debate

Last night KATU and Portland State University held a debate and town hall on raising Oregon’s minimum wage. The need for a $15 minimum wage in Oregon dominated the evenings questions and discussion, which was often tense and heated. The audience clearly favored a $15 minimum wage, and was not shy about letting the opposition know they weren’t buying the doomsday arguments.

Olivia_TeresaMembers of 15 Now PDX and the Portland State University Student Union (PSUSU) turned out to the event in force. About three quarters of the way into the debate, Olivia Pace from PSUSU challenged Jeff Stone, Executive Director and CEO of the Oregon Association of Nurseries, on his assertion that President FDR never intended the minimum wage to be a living wage. Olivia then went on to challenge the assertion of Dr. Tom Potiowsky, chair of PSU’s Economics Department and former Oregon state economist, that poverty could be ended simply by ending discrimination.

Click here to see Olivia Pace of PSUSU challenge the debaters

After Olivia finished her exchange with Dr. Potiowsky, students and 15 Now activists temporarily disrupted the event with a mic check, explaining that the University wastes millions of dollars while refusing to pay low-wage workers on campus a $15 per hour wage, and highlighting groups of workers on campus that make less than $15.

Click here to see video of the mic check

debate2When the mic check ended the debate resumed as normal. At the end of the televised portion of the event, Ramon Ramirez, president of PCUN, Oregon’s farmworkers union, got a chance to tell the story of six farmworkers who were standing there next to him. They pick hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of high end shiitake mushrooms, make minimum wage, and got fired this past Sunday for asking for a 20 cent per hour raise.

Unfortunately, the whole story did not get to be told on air. The moderator of the event cut Ramon off to end the live broadcast. ThisDebate1 upset many members of the audience, who called out for the moderator to let Ramon finish his story. When the moderator insisted, members of the audience, led by students, erupted into a chant of “15 Now” that took over the last 15 seconds of the live broadcast.

Here is the entire broadcast in full:

World Homeless Day – $15 and the Fight Against Houslessness

This past Saturday was World Homeless Day, and it was also the birthday of Right 2 Dream Too, the well maintained and self-managed tent city in downtown Portland that has done more for the houseless community in four years, and done it with way fewer resources, than the City’s 10 Year Plan and millions of dollars spent could ever claim. It seems appropriate then to take a look at houselessness in Oregon and ask what a statewide $15 minimum wage would do to help alleviate the problem.

According to the most recent point-in-time count, on any given night there are some 4,000 houseless men, women, and children sleeping on the streets of Portland. Even more startling is that according to a 2013 report there are 38,000 children throughout Oregon who are considered homeless. That’s the fifth highest rate of child homelessness in the country.

Continue reading World Homeless Day – $15 and the Fight Against Houslessness

New Portland Restaurants Prove Paying $15 Doesn’t Have to mean Higher Prices

During a recent conversation about the cost of living in Oregon and raising the minimum wage, a representative from an Oregon business lobby asserted that a $15 minimum wage won’t make any difference. After all prices will simply go up across the board, wiping out any newfound buying power that low-wage workers might have thought they would have. It’s a forgone conclusion!

As an example he used Ivar’s Seafood Bar, a Seattle-area restaurant chain that started paying $15 per hour ahead of the scheduled phase in period that will last for the next 6 years. It also eliminated the social obligation to tip by increasing prices by about 20% and distributing that among the employees.

So yes, Ivar’s did raise its prices, but it raised its prices by the amount one would tip, as an alternative to socially obligated tipping. You’re paying about the same as if you would have tipped, and the workers are still getting a share of that price increase, as they would if it were a tip. The price increase was about the elimination of socially obligated tipping, not about compensating for the increase in the workers’ base pay to $15 per hour.

But aside from the clearly flawed example used by the business lobbyist, we’d like to point out the absurdity of the assumption that raising the minimum wage to $15 necessitates price increases.

Continue reading New Portland Restaurants Prove Paying $15 Doesn’t Have to mean Higher Prices

Oregonians for 15 Files Ballot Measure for a Statewide $15 Minimum Wage

Building on momentum from the packed minimum wage hearing in Salem on April 13th, and from huge rallies for $15 in Portland and at worksites across the state on April 15th as part of a national day of action, Oregonians for 15 filed today with the State Elections Division for a ballot measure that would raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2019.
Two bills in the legislature for $15, HB 2009 and SB 610, have attracted massive grassroots support and media attention over the last few months, but political leaders such as Peter Courtney (D-Salem) have indicated that the legislature will not raise the minimum wage this session.
Chief Petitioner Jamie Partridge filing for $15 minimum wage ballot initiative in Oregon.
Chief Petitioner Jamie Partridge filing for $15 minimum wage ballot initiative in Oregon.

“Working people are becoming increasingly impatient with legislators’ inability to act” said 15 Now Oregon member and chief petitioner Jamie Partridge. “If the legislature won’t do the right thing, then we’ll take $15 to a vote of the people.” Other chief petitioners for the initiative are Marcy Westerling, founder of the Rural Organizing Project, and Ramon Ramirez, president of Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (Northwest Treeplanters and Farmworkers United).

David Carlson, a low-wage pizza chef who lives in Aloha, Washington County, was happy to hear the news about the measure for a $15 minimum wage, “I think it’s great. I have bills to pay. If the legislature is going to drag its feet, then the people should get the chance to vote on it.” 
Windy Wiebke, a single mother who works as a night custodian at South Eugene High School, added, “I’ve worked here for six and a half years and I still make less than $15. I’m not some kid just starting out. My rent won’t wait. $12 or $13 isn’t enough for me and my family to survive. I need $15 now.”
One of the most frequent questions raised by opponents at Monday’s minimum wage hearings was what effect an increase to $15 might have on small businesses. When asked about the ballot measure and how a $15 minimum wage would effect her business, Marci Pelletier, owner of Schwop retail boutique in Portland, said, “It’s heartening to hear about Friday’s $15 ballot measure filing. I think I speak for many small business leaders who are getting impatient as the legislature fails to act on a measure that would put cash in the hands of my future customers while giving hundreds of thousands of working Oregonians a chance to get out of poverty.”
15 Now Oregon Statewide Organizing Director Kristi Wright expressed optimism about the ballot measure, “This is a big undertaking, but we know we have strong support from our community. Oregonians are pioneers, and together we’ll make our state the first to end poverty wages.”
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We are going to fight for working people like David and Windy, and for our small business owners too! Our next step is to collect 1,000 valid signatures to get the Secretary of State to draft the ballot title. Once that is done we can begin collecting the over 88,000 valid signatures we’ll need to qualify for the 2016 ballot.
Kristi is right, this is a big undertaking, and it’s going to take a lot of resources. Big business is going to spend millions to try and stop us. But with your help, if we all unite together, there is no stopping us!
 

Portland Joins National Day of Action For $15 Minimum Wage With Huge Downtown March

The national movement for a $15 minimum wage has come to Portland. Building on momentum from Monday’s packed minimum wage hearing in Salem and the announcement that 15 Now Oregon will file a ballot measure for a statewide $15 minimum wage, over 400 community members and workers marched through downtown Portland as part of a historic national day of awareness, action, and strikes for $15 taking place in over 200 cities in the U.S. and countries around the world.

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Demonstrators outside of Portland City Hall. Photo by Hyung Nam.

From Portland’s City Hall to Oregon’s Capitol, workers and a growing group of supporters have been calling on decision makers to give working families a fair shot by raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour. In February, Portland’s City Council heard the message loud and clear, unanimously passing a $15 an hour minimum wage for all full-time City workers and contracted workers. Multnomah County also raised the minimum wage for all it’s employees to $15 an hour last December.

City workers, home care workers, food service workers, early childhood educatos, janitors and more joined in today’s march demanding $15. After a brief rally at O’Bryant Square, the march went straight across the street to the Pittock Building where they took over and shut down the lobby, releasing balloons and chanting in solidarity with janitors who work in the building.

Continue reading Portland Joins National Day of Action For $15 Minimum Wage With Huge Downtown March

Hundreds of Supporters Attend Hearing in Salem, 15 Now Oregon Announces Ballot Measure

by Justin Norton-Kertson

On Monday evening at the Oregon State Capitol Building in Salem, community groups, labor unions, low-wage workers, and activists from throughout the state flooded the committee hearing room and spilled into overflow rooms to express strong support for a bill that would raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $15 an hour over three years.

Click here to watch the hearing

Seattle and San Francisco both approved a minimum wage of $15 last year, and Oregon would be the first state to follow suit. At a press conference before the hearing, 15 Now Oregon representatives announced plans to file for a ballot measure this week, and to begin collecting signatures to qualify for the 2016 election.

Photo by Teresa Roberts
Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek with $15 supporters. Photo by Teresa Roberts

Supporters of a $15 minimum wage urged legislators to initiate a floor vote on SB 610, and expressed concern that big business lobbyists were working behind the scenes to kill the bill. Dozens wore red T-shirts while hundreds more wore green buttons, all emblazoned with the 15 Now Oregon logo.

Continue reading Hundreds of Supporters Attend Hearing in Salem, 15 Now Oregon Announces Ballot Measure

All Out for Committee Hearing on $15 Minimum Wage in Oregon

Call out to all low-wage workers, labor unions, community organizations, Oregon residents, concerned citizens…

Income equality is out of control. The cost of living in Oregon continually outpaces the national inflation rate. Working families in Oregon increasingly have to rely on food stamps, Oregon Health Plan, and other public benefits because big businesses increase their profits by paying poverty wages to hard working people. Oregon taxpayers subsidize those poverty wages to the tune of more than $1.7 billion per year.

SB 610 will raise Oregon’s minimum wage and help bring working families out of poverty. This and other minimum wage bills have a public joint committee hearing at the state capitol building in Salem on Monday April 13th at 6pm.fbInvite

Let’s pack the capitol and demand that our legislators be real leaders, that they take a stand for working people in Oregon, that the committees vote YES on SB 610 for a $15 minimum wage in Oregon. No one who works should live in poverty!

Attend the hearing! sign up to testify! Tell legislators why a $15 minimum wage will help you and your family, or someone you know! Don’t Kill The Bill! Demand a floor vote!

Let us know you are coming by RSVPing at https://www.facebook.com/events/423536561141274/

There will be a couple buses going from Portland to Salem. Buses will leave Porltand at 3:30 p.m. one from SE 26th and Powell, and one fro. A location still to be determined in NE Portland. Check back soon for the updates on the NE bus departure location. Buses will return to Portland when the hearing is over.

If you would like a seat on the bus please email us and tell us:

1) how many seats you need and the names of those who will fill those seats, 2) whether you want to depart from NE or SE Portland, and 3) a good contact phone number we can reach you at.

In the few weeks leading up to the hearing, please call the Democrat members of the committee and tell them DON’T KILL THE BILL! Demand a floor vote on SB 610 for a $15 minimum wage!

House Business and Labor Committee – HB 2009:
1) Rep. Shamia Fagan 503-986-1451
2) Rep. Brent Barton 503-986-1440
3) Rep. Margaret Doherty 503-986-1435
4) Rep. Paul Evans 503-986-1420
5) Rep. Paul Holvey (chair) 503-986-1408
6) Rep Rob Nosse 503-986-1442

Senate Workforce Committee – SB 610:
1) Sen. Michael Dembrow (chair) 503-986-1723
2) Sen. Diane Rosenbaum 503-986-1700
3) Sen. Sara Gelser 503-986-1708