Category Archives: Solidarity

Students shut down PSU Board of Trustees meeting, demand $15 Now for all campus workers

by Justin Norton-Kertson

The Portland State University Board of Trustees received an ear-full from a crowd of dozens of students, campus workers, professors, and community members who packed today’s board meeting, and who are fed up with being ignored by university administration and leadership. The day’s action comes after years of being ignored, and was an escalation of a year of direct action by the Portland State University Student union (PSUSU) over the arming of campus security and a host of other issues.

PSU President Wim Weiwel with other members of the PSU Board of Trustees.
PSU President Wim Weiwel (center) with other members of the PSU Board of Trustees.

The day’s action also comes just weeks after the president of the Associated Students of PSU, Dana Gazi, issued a statement calling for a mass student movement. That statement mirrored many of the demands that have been made by PSUSU such as disarming campus police, free college tuition, cancelation of student debt, a living wage for all campus workers, and an end to business model higher education.  Gazi spoke at today’s meeting echoing much of the sentiment in their open letter.

Students spoke at the meeting about racism, Islamophobia, and a growing concern about open white supremacy on campus,  as well the arming of campus security, poverty wages paid on campus, student hunger and houselessness, the cutting of arts programs, bloated administrative salaries and perks, and a host of other issues that the board has all but ignored student voices on for years.  Continue reading Students shut down PSU Board of Trustees meeting, demand $15 Now for all campus workers

Workers at PDX First Unitarian Church Win $15 and a Union

by Justin Norton-Kertson

As part of their first union contract, workers at the First Unitarian Church of Portland are guaranteed a wage of at least $15 per hour. This includes employees who are not part of the union, and is retroactive back to July 1, 2015.

The Portland Area Campaign for $15, which is being led by Portland Jobs with Justice, and of which 15 Now PDX is a part, is working to raise the minimum wage for at least 30,000 Portland area workers by 2017 through contract bargaining such as in the case of the First Unitarian Church, through voluntary commitments, and through new organizing campaigns for $15 and a union.

The following was originally published on the First Unitarian Church website on 11/19/15

Justice Begins at Home!

It was one year ago when some of our staff came into my office and requested recognition of a union for our employees. For almost nine months representatives of the employees and of the church administration have been in negotiation to craft an initial labor contract. Last spring, more than 300 individuals and families pledged additional financial support for increased wages to allow Justice to Begin at Home.

I am delighted to tell you that late last Tuesday, agreement was reached on our first labor contract. The members of the union approved its terms, as did the Executive Team. Last Sunday, the cost of the contract was approved by our Board of Trustees. The final document is being prepared for signatures, but agreement has been reached.

As promised when we raised the Justice Begins at Home funds, First Unitarian will now pay all of its employees at least a $15/hour minimum wage. That includes all employees, even those not in the union. The only exception is a six month probationary period for new employees. This significant raise will be retro-active to July 1. The benefits we offer, which are generous in the non-profit world, will remain undiminished.

A number of salaried employees, both in the union and outside, will also receive adjustments to their compensation. Most of these will be modest. Our goal remains to continue adjusting compensation for salaried staff as the congregation makes resources available.

We can be proud that we have taken a significant step toward the justice and equity our principles proclaim.

As we approach Celebration Sunday, we have much to be thankful for in this church community. The stars hung around the sanctuary speak of the inspiration, the support, the challenge and the love we create together in this place. We can now add our commitment to leadership in just compensation. The Beloved Community is built not only with words, but with our wallets. Our ability to fulfill the terms of this agreement depends on the continued generosity of the members of this community. Our gratitude for First Church needs to be matched with our willingness to support it.

I want to thank Nicole Bowmer, Jason Chapman and Nick Harrington who represented the union at the bargaining table. Also Rev. Tom Disrud and Pat Malone who represented the Executive Team. Special thanks to John Bishop, a congregant with extensive labor negotiation experience, who helped the process, not representing either side.

Last, but not least, thanks to all those who have waited patiently and all those who have contributed generously and all those who affirmed the need for the church to take this step. This achievement is all of ours to celebrate.

Blessings,

Bill

World Homeless Day – $15 and the Fight Against Houslessness

This past Saturday was World Homeless Day, and it was also the birthday of Right 2 Dream Too, the well maintained and self-managed tent city in downtown Portland that has done more for the houseless community in four years, and done it with way fewer resources, than the City’s 10 Year Plan and millions of dollars spent could ever claim. It seems appropriate then to take a look at houselessness in Oregon and ask what a statewide $15 minimum wage would do to help alleviate the problem.

According to the most recent point-in-time count, on any given night there are some 4,000 houseless men, women, and children sleeping on the streets of Portland. Even more startling is that according to a 2013 report there are 38,000 children throughout Oregon who are considered homeless. That’s the fifth highest rate of child homelessness in the country.

Continue reading World Homeless Day – $15 and the Fight Against Houslessness

New 15 Now Oregon Statewide Website

The movement for a $15 minimum wage in Oregon continues to grow well beyond the boundaries of the Portland metro area. With chapters in Eugene, Ashland, La Grande and other Oregon cities, with help from organizations like the Rural Organizing Project, and with a newly filed ballot measure for a statewide $15 minimum wage, the Fight for $15 has truly become a statewide movement here in Oregon.

Now there is a new website that you can visit to stay up to date on  the struggle for a living wage all over Oregon. Visit www.15noworegon.org to see what’s going on around the state and how you can get involved in the Fight for $15 in your community!

Unions Must Step Up: How A $15 Minimum Wage Helps All Workers

(First published on CounterPunch)

Giant corporations and the wealthy are naturally united in their hatred of the $15 minimum wage. Surprising, however, is the strong opposition sometimes encountered by workers who make barely above $15 an hour.

The anti-$15 logic of these workers varies. Some simply repeat the misinformation they hear on the media, that a higher minimum wage would cause mass inflation and unemployment, regardless of the fact that — according to the U.S. Department of Labor — there is no evidence to support these claims.

Some workers against $15 say such an increase isn’t fair, since they haven’t had a raise in years and have worked hard to get what little they have. Unfortunately, it’s becoming increasingly untrue that people “get ahead” when they work hard. The economy has fundamentally shifted in the last 30 years to the point where the average fast food worker is now 29 years old.

Hundreds march through the streets of Portland on April 15 demand a $15 minimum wage. Photo by Hyung Nam.
Hundreds march through the streets of Portland, OR on April 15 demand a $15 minimum wage. Photo by Hyung Nam.

Opportunities to earn a living wage have shrunk exponentially.  According to a recent study 43 percent of the U.S. workforce earns under $15 an hour. There are simply not enough high wage jobs to leap into; the leaping is now going in the opposite direction.

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AFSCME Local 3580 Metro Temp Workers Win Huge Raise, Great First Contract!

Temporary workers represented by AFSCME Local 3580 won huge wage raises in their first negotiated contract this week. All those represented will get cost of living adjustments. Hazardous waste workers get a raise from $13.55 per hour to a minimum wage of $17.50 per hour.  Zoo security wages go from $12 to a $15.75 minimum. Scale House workers also jumpy to a $15.75 minimum wage, and Program Animals workers at the Zoo jump to a minimum wage of $16.01.

These are huge gains and we congratulate the affected workers and the union representatives who fought for them at the bargaining table on huge victory.

A statement from AFSCME reads:

“After over three months of bargaining we have finally released an agreement. while not perfect, we feel we made some great gains, especially to wages. Big thanks to our Members, Jobs With Justice, and 15 Now for the support. Also, Metro management deserves credit for making positive movement that will help workers and the community for a long time.”

AFSCME Victory

While this is a great victory for more workers, a victory that helps us gain momentum to build and win $15 for even more working people in Portland and across Oregon, we must recognize it as just that, a start. Portland Metro now joins Multnomah County and the City of Portland in not only recognizing, but in acting on the fact that anything less than $15 is not enough in the Portland area. We call on Metro Council to take further action to ensure that all Metro workers have at least a $15 minimum wage and a clear and unobstructed path to unionization regardless of their particular employment classification.

No one who works should live in poverty.

The Strategic Significance of the Fight for $15

by Ann Robertson, Bill Leumer

In Oregon…This entire campaign is an example of working people relying on themselves rather than turning to the Democrats to beg for handouts and could be used as a model throughout the country.

This article was originally published by Common Dreams on January 2, 2015.

The fight for $15, a movement that started two years ago with a walkout of fast food workers in New York, has been gaining momentum ever since. In early December 2014, workers staged one-day strikes in over 150 cities, creating what The New York Times called “the largest labor protests in the nation in years.”

Additionally significant is the fact that the movement has been reviving the principle of solidarity — a principle so often forgotten in the current labor movement — with home care aides and convenience store workers joining the protests. These workers fully grasp the principle that if they step up and help other workers in struggle, they will get support when they themselves are in need.

The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) has played an indispensable role, helping crystallize the movement by supplying $10 million to help finance the organizing operations. By underwriting a struggle that not only benefits some of their own workers but those outside of its ranks as well, SEIU is embracing the finest principle of the union movement: Instead of pursuing their own narrow self-interests at the expense of everyone else, like those unions that support the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, SEIU is championing the interests of the working class as a whole. Even workers who make more than $15 will benefit from a substantially higher minimum wage because the bottom will have been raised and expectations adjusted accordingly.

Click Here to read full article

Don’t Shoot Portland endorses $15, highlighting connection between poverty, racism, police brutality

Don’t Shoot Portland has endorsed a $15 minimum wage and not just for the City of Portland. Responding to today’s news that all Multnomah County employees have won a $15 minimum wage, Don’t Shoot Portland organizer Teressa Raiford said, “That’s a great step, but we need to make sure we win $15 for the whole state, for all of Oregon.”

Since August of 2014, Don’t Shoot Portland has organized mass rallies, community meetings, and public forums around the issue of police killings and brutality, systemic racism and racial profiling, and oppression of communities of color in the wake of the murder of Michael Brown at the hands of Officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri.

Don’t Shoot Portland has shown a tremendous ability to harness the disillusioned outrage of a new generation of civil rights activists in Portland, to draw relevant connections between Ferguson and police brutality and killings here locally in Portland, and translate it all into powerful public action and discourse. It is worth our time to explore how the problem of systemic racism and police oppression of communities of color goes hand in hand with the problem of systemic poverty and income inequality.

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Over 1,000 people march through the streets of downtown Portland to demand justice for Michael Brown — Photo by Hart Noecker

The Problem

Racism, racial profiling, and police oppression are serious problems that are faced daily by black communities throughout Oregon and the U.S. From the earliest days of American law when black people where legally deemed the property of white men, through Jim Crow and Oregon’s exclusion laws, down to the prison-industrial complex today the system was, in fact, never meant to serve and protect black communities. Today, one unarmed black person is shot and killed by police every 28 hours in America.

They are killed by the same police that are called on to violently break up peaceful demonstrations and civil disobedience against police brutality and corporate domination of our society. They are the same police who are called on to serve the corporate state by violently attacking striking workers and forcing them back to work.

The militarized police forces in this country are used to protect corporate wealth and power. This is certainly true when it comes to keeping communities of color in poverty and prison, and it is true when it comes to breaking strikes and squelching first amendment expression. The racism and systemic problems that allow police to get away with murdering unarmed black men are on and the same as the racism and systemic problems that allow massive corporations and a few mostly white individuals to amass and hoard vast amounts of wealth while communities of color live in poverty.

It is no secret that poverty is one of the major causes of violence and crime. Many of these “crimes” are nothing more than crimes of survival. Crimes people commit because they are hungry and desperate, they have kids to feed, and they can’t survive on the poverty wages offered by the American economy. So they seek black market and other opportunities to provide for themselves and their families. Like Eric Garner selling single cigarettes on a street corner in New York City. Now he is dead.

When talking about how these issues intersect, Teressa Raiford said it best and simply when she said, “We all know that we aren’t going to end violence unless we end poverty.”

When it comes to poverty, communities of color are disproportionately represented as a result of the racism that has been built into the American economic and legal system. For example, white people make up 88% of Oregon’s population, and only 15% of white people in Oregon live in poverty according to the Oregon Center for Public Policy. On the other hand, while black people make up a disturbingly small 2% of Oregon’s population, a staggering 41% of black Oregonians live in poverty.  This shows that just like police oppression, violence and murder, systemic poverty is a serious issue for communities of color. Systemic racism (a tool for dividing the working class) in a country who’s laws were never meant to protect and serve the black community is at the heart of both the problems of poverty and police violence in that community.

The Solution

There is no one solution to these problems. These problems are systemic, meaning that they are part of the very structure and they are built into the very institutions that compose and hold up our society. The only way some people can be filthy rich, with billions of dollars that they could never spend in one lifetime, is by keeping the masses of people in poverty, people who work hard to create the wealth their bosses hoard. Indeed, today half of all Americans either live in poverty or are on the brink of poverty. In Oregon, 72% of families living in poverty have at least one parent that works.

Poverty is not an issue of laziness, or a matter of a lack of skills or education. Those families and parents work hard to try and provide for their families. It is simply a matter of a system built upon the fact that a few people can get disgustingly rich only if the masses are either in slavery, or are paid poverty wages.

In the same way, communities of color are kept in poverty and in prison because our unjust economic system needs low-wage workers, it needs soldiers, its needs cannon fodder. And so communities of color are hounded and oppressed by militarized police forces. They are shoveled down a school-to-prison pipeline that ensures our prison-industrial complex is continuously fed new slave labor for companies that use prisoners as a labor force. Many of these companies, such as Target and Macy’s, are among the same companies that are guilty of paying poverty wages to their non-prison labor force. It is also ensured, through background checks and laws allowing businesses to discriminate against felons, that once out of prison people remain in poverty and are unable to find good jobs and move up the economic ladder. They are relegated to poverty wage jobs.

If all these problems are systemic, then the solution to these problems is also systemic. We must Fight for $15 to help alleviate the pressure of poverty on communities of color and all other communities suffering from systemic income inequality. We must fight to end police brutality and racial profiling, to end a racist system in which police can indiscriminately kill unarmed black people and get away with it.

We need to join together, unite across movements into one mass movement to create the systemic changes necessary for real justice to be ensured. We need a new civil rights era with people engaging in mass protests, strikes, and walkouts to demand justice: economic justice, racial justice, social justice, environmental justice…justice for all!

Click here to visit the 15 Now PDX Facebook page

Justin Norton-Kertson is an organizer and steering committee member with 15 Now Portland, and is the Northwest regional representative on the 15 Now national steering committee.

What the $15 minimum wage means to our members set to receive it

By DON LOVING Council 75 Communications Director

Oregon AFSCME was in the news recently when, within a week’s time, two major Portland public employers announced agreements with their respective AFSCME local unions to establish $15 minimum wage floors in their contracts.

The first agreement came at Home Forward, Portland’s housing authority agency, and was an add-on clause to Local 3135’s existing contract. Then, days later, Local 88 and Multnomah County announced agreement on a new three-year pact that included the $15 minimum wage as one of its components. Home Forward is jumping the 33 employees covered by the increase to $15 immediately; Multnomah County will phase in its 155 employees effected by the increase over the life of the contract.

But with the initial excitement by the announcements having moved on a bit in news cycles, what do the people actually impacted think?

At Multnomah County, about 93 percent of those who will benefit from the increased minimum wage are library pages. Pages have a wide variety of duties, ranging from shelving books and other materials movements to directly helping customers with questions or library account maintenance.

Jennifer Behr has been a Multnomah County Library page for 26 years.

“For me it’s validation and recognition of the work we do,” says Behr. “What we do isn’t ‘minor’ — it has value. It’s also important that the county compensates even its lowest-paid workers with a living wage.”

…Jasmine Criss is a resident specialist at Home Forward’s Hollywood East complex, an apartment building with 289 units and well over 300 residents. She works with the agency’s property management team and directly with residents on the myriad of issues that crop up within Hollywood East’s enclosed community.

Criss is 22, single, and goes to Portland Community College part-time while working her full-time job at Home Forward. She’s seeing an immediate wage increase of $2.45 per hour (from $12.55 to $15), and says that difference is huge to her limited budget.

“For the first time, I have breathing room — that’s the best way to put it,” says Criss. “It’s been hard, especially going to school, to pay everything and balance my budget. Now I’m going to be able to do that, and I’ll have about $50 per month left over for extras, or to simply save. I’ve never had that, so it’s a big deal.”

Click Here To Read The Full Article on the Oregon AFSCME Website