Category Archives: Legislation

Oregon’s Governor Already Compromising on Minimum Wage…Again

Hardly a week has gone by since Governor Brown unveiled her grand compromise on minimum wage and she is already compromising again, watering down her proposal even more.

Originally, after almost a year of utter silence and complete lack of leadership from Governor Brown on this issue, she proposed $15.52 in six years for the 25 cities within the Portland urban growth boundary, and $13.50 in six years for the rest of the state with no restoration of local control over minimum wage laws. This plan was already a compromise from the previous session where a statewide $15 minimum wage over a shorter three year phase in—and the restoration of local control of minimum wage laws—were the only proposals with any traction.

Now after more secret negotiations and compromises, Brown’s proposal has been lowered to $14.50 and $13.25. What did not change about her proposal is the ridiculously long phase in of six years, which renders the raise virtually meaningless. What also didn’t change is that local control is still not restored. As we expected, local control was the first of many things to be compromised away in Democrats’ fetish for ensuring that anything they pass meets at least some scant approval of their corporate election funders.

True, workers get a smaller and insufficient raise a few months earlier. The original proposal called for a first step to $11.79 in the Portland area and $10.25 for the rest of the state on January 1, 2017. The new proposal has a first step of $9.75 in July 2016 for the whole state. That is $2 per hour less in the Portland area and 50 cents per hour less everywhere else. This new and further diluted proposal is not impressive. There is nothing here to get excited about.

It is, however, exactly what is to be expected from corporate politicians who are much more interested in playing games and brokering deals with wealthy business donors and lobbyists than they are in fighting for Oregon’s working families. Big business is getting exactly what it wants from their new Governor: the state legislature that they have purchased will continue to have singular control over minimum wage laws in the state—to the detriment of local economies—and businesses get a minimum wage increase with a phase in that is too long to be of any significant value in terms of ending poverty wages and ensuring that working families are self-sufficient.

As an organization that is lead and run by low-wage workers and their allies, we are having difficulty finding anything in this compromised proposal that is worth celebrating. It is one thing to sit in a well funded office and praise the proposal because low-wage workers get a smaller raise a little sooner than in the original plan. It is another thing to actually be that low-wage worker, to look at your next paycheck and realize that your pay is so low that you didn’t even notice the extra 50 cents per hour and that you really needed that other two dollar now.

A statewide $15 minimum wage is not only demonstrably what is needed in Oregon to ensure that working families are self-sufficient, but it also was and still can be a viable and winnable fight. Two years before the November 2016 election, a statewide $15 minimum wage was already polling favorably among a majority of likely Oregon voters. If the labor movement unites and stands strong for $15, if we work side-by-side to reignite a working class fighting spirit and build an empowered workers’ movement, then we can win the Fight for $15 and we can win it for all Oregonians.

That victory is still within reach. Let us unite and Fight for $15!

Repeal Oregon’s Anti-Worker Minimum Wage Preemption Law

In the past year Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles have passed $15  minimum wage laws. Some smaller cities have raised their minimum wage even higher. Unfortunately, cities in Oregon and number of other states such as Pennsylvania, Oklahoma, and New York don’t have the right to raise their own minimum wage above the level set by their state governments.

A minimum wage preemption law is basically a law that says only the state can set minimum wage rates. In states like Oregon that have these preemption laws cities, counties and other local governments aren’t allowed to set their own minimum wages. So right now, despite the fact that raising the minimum wage to $15 is massively popular in Portland, this preemption law prevents us from raising the minimum wage here in our city.

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which is responsible for some of the nation’s worst legislative attacks on labor and the environment, has been systematically pushing for statewide minimum wage preemption laws for over a decade. In fact, ALEC even has it’s own Living Wage Mandate Preemption Act that state’s can use to save anti-worker legislators the time of having to write their own bills.

Continue reading Repeal Oregon’s Anti-Worker Minimum Wage Preemption Law

Oregonians for 15 Files Ballot Measure for a Statewide $15 Minimum Wage

Building on momentum from the packed minimum wage hearing in Salem on April 13th, and from huge rallies for $15 in Portland and at worksites across the state on April 15th as part of a national day of action, Oregonians for 15 filed today with the State Elections Division for a ballot measure that would raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2019.
Two bills in the legislature for $15, HB 2009 and SB 610, have attracted massive grassroots support and media attention over the last few months, but political leaders such as Peter Courtney (D-Salem) have indicated that the legislature will not raise the minimum wage this session.
Chief Petitioner Jamie Partridge filing for $15 minimum wage ballot initiative in Oregon.
Chief Petitioner Jamie Partridge filing for $15 minimum wage ballot initiative in Oregon.

“Working people are becoming increasingly impatient with legislators’ inability to act” said 15 Now Oregon member and chief petitioner Jamie Partridge. “If the legislature won’t do the right thing, then we’ll take $15 to a vote of the people.” Other chief petitioners for the initiative are Marcy Westerling, founder of the Rural Organizing Project, and Ramon Ramirez, president of Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (Northwest Treeplanters and Farmworkers United).

David Carlson, a low-wage pizza chef who lives in Aloha, Washington County, was happy to hear the news about the measure for a $15 minimum wage, “I think it’s great. I have bills to pay. If the legislature is going to drag its feet, then the people should get the chance to vote on it.” 
Windy Wiebke, a single mother who works as a night custodian at South Eugene High School, added, “I’ve worked here for six and a half years and I still make less than $15. I’m not some kid just starting out. My rent won’t wait. $12 or $13 isn’t enough for me and my family to survive. I need $15 now.”
One of the most frequent questions raised by opponents at Monday’s minimum wage hearings was what effect an increase to $15 might have on small businesses. When asked about the ballot measure and how a $15 minimum wage would effect her business, Marci Pelletier, owner of Schwop retail boutique in Portland, said, “It’s heartening to hear about Friday’s $15 ballot measure filing. I think I speak for many small business leaders who are getting impatient as the legislature fails to act on a measure that would put cash in the hands of my future customers while giving hundreds of thousands of working Oregonians a chance to get out of poverty.”
15 Now Oregon Statewide Organizing Director Kristi Wright expressed optimism about the ballot measure, “This is a big undertaking, but we know we have strong support from our community. Oregonians are pioneers, and together we’ll make our state the first to end poverty wages.”
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We are going to fight for working people like David and Windy, and for our small business owners too! Our next step is to collect 1,000 valid signatures to get the Secretary of State to draft the ballot title. Once that is done we can begin collecting the over 88,000 valid signatures we’ll need to qualify for the 2016 ballot.
Kristi is right, this is a big undertaking, and it’s going to take a lot of resources. Big business is going to spend millions to try and stop us. But with your help, if we all unite together, there is no stopping us!
 

Hundreds of Supporters Attend Hearing in Salem, 15 Now Oregon Announces Ballot Measure

by Justin Norton-Kertson

On Monday evening at the Oregon State Capitol Building in Salem, community groups, labor unions, low-wage workers, and activists from throughout the state flooded the committee hearing room and spilled into overflow rooms to express strong support for a bill that would raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $15 an hour over three years.

Click here to watch the hearing

Seattle and San Francisco both approved a minimum wage of $15 last year, and Oregon would be the first state to follow suit. At a press conference before the hearing, 15 Now Oregon representatives announced plans to file for a ballot measure this week, and to begin collecting signatures to qualify for the 2016 election.

Photo by Teresa Roberts
Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek with $15 supporters. Photo by Teresa Roberts

Supporters of a $15 minimum wage urged legislators to initiate a floor vote on SB 610, and expressed concern that big business lobbyists were working behind the scenes to kill the bill. Dozens wore red T-shirts while hundreds more wore green buttons, all emblazoned with the 15 Now Oregon logo.

Continue reading Hundreds of Supporters Attend Hearing in Salem, 15 Now Oregon Announces Ballot Measure

All Out for Committee Hearing on $15 Minimum Wage in Oregon

Call out to all low-wage workers, labor unions, community organizations, Oregon residents, concerned citizens…

Income equality is out of control. The cost of living in Oregon continually outpaces the national inflation rate. Working families in Oregon increasingly have to rely on food stamps, Oregon Health Plan, and other public benefits because big businesses increase their profits by paying poverty wages to hard working people. Oregon taxpayers subsidize those poverty wages to the tune of more than $1.7 billion per year.

SB 610 will raise Oregon’s minimum wage and help bring working families out of poverty. This and other minimum wage bills have a public joint committee hearing at the state capitol building in Salem on Monday April 13th at 6pm.fbInvite

Let’s pack the capitol and demand that our legislators be real leaders, that they take a stand for working people in Oregon, that the committees vote YES on SB 610 for a $15 minimum wage in Oregon. No one who works should live in poverty!

Attend the hearing! sign up to testify! Tell legislators why a $15 minimum wage will help you and your family, or someone you know! Don’t Kill The Bill! Demand a floor vote!

Let us know you are coming by RSVPing at https://www.facebook.com/events/423536561141274/

There will be a couple buses going from Portland to Salem. Buses will leave Porltand at 3:30 p.m. one from SE 26th and Powell, and one fro. A location still to be determined in NE Portland. Check back soon for the updates on the NE bus departure location. Buses will return to Portland when the hearing is over.

If you would like a seat on the bus please email us and tell us:

1) how many seats you need and the names of those who will fill those seats, 2) whether you want to depart from NE or SE Portland, and 3) a good contact phone number we can reach you at.

In the few weeks leading up to the hearing, please call the Democrat members of the committee and tell them DON’T KILL THE BILL! Demand a floor vote on SB 610 for a $15 minimum wage!

House Business and Labor Committee – HB 2009:
1) Rep. Shamia Fagan 503-986-1451
2) Rep. Brent Barton 503-986-1440
3) Rep. Margaret Doherty 503-986-1435
4) Rep. Paul Evans 503-986-1420
5) Rep. Paul Holvey (chair) 503-986-1408
6) Rep Rob Nosse 503-986-1442

Senate Workforce Committee – SB 610:
1) Sen. Michael Dembrow (chair) 503-986-1723
2) Sen. Diane Rosenbaum 503-986-1700
3) Sen. Sara Gelser 503-986-1708

 

15 Now Oregon Shows Growing Strength, Announces 2015 Legislation for a $15 Minimum Wage in Oregon

After recently delivering over 5,000 signatures in support of a $15 minimum wage at an economic fairness town hall meeting hosted by Oregon Senate Majority Leader Diane Rosenbaum and Representative Rob Nosse, the fight for a $15 minimum wage in Oregon continued to show its growing strength this week with the holding of the first statewide 15 Now Oregon general meeting.

Held at SEIU Local 503’s union hall and organized by 15 Now PDX, dozens of people attended the meeting including members from LiUNA 483, SEIU Locals 503 and 49, Oregon State Association of Letter Carriers, Oregon Education Association, Portland Association of Teachers, Rural Organizing Project, Health Care for All Oregon, the Democratic Socialists of America, Socialist Alternative, and International Socialist Organization.  People came from all over Oregon to attended the meeting including from places such as Beaverton, Oregon City, Salem, Medford, and Ashland, and of course Portland. There are also new 15 Now chapters in The Dalles and Eugene that did not have representatives at the meeting. Low-wage professionals represented included various low wage food service and home care workers, who gave testimony about their stories and experiences with low paid work.

There was a welcome surprise at the meeting as it was announced that minimum wage bills for the 2015 state legislative session have been submitted to the state’s Legislative Counsel from both the Oregon State House and the Oregon Senate. The bills submitted include bills to raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $15/hr, and to repeal Oregon’s minimum wage preemption law that prevents cities from raising the minimum wage above the level set by the state. If the $15/hr minimum wage bill passes Oregon will be the first whole state to enact a $15 living wage, which will make Oregon the national leader on the minimum wage question.