Tag Archives: Oregon

Students shut down PSU Board of Trustees meeting, demand $15 Now for all campus workers

by Justin Norton-Kertson

The Portland State University Board of Trustees received an ear-full from a crowd of dozens of students, campus workers, professors, and community members who packed today’s board meeting, and who are fed up with being ignored by university administration and leadership. The day’s action comes after years of being ignored, and was an escalation of a year of direct action by the Portland State University Student union (PSUSU) over the arming of campus security and a host of other issues.

PSU President Wim Weiwel with other members of the PSU Board of Trustees.
PSU President Wim Weiwel (center) with other members of the PSU Board of Trustees.

The day’s action also comes just weeks after the president of the Associated Students of PSU, Dana Gazi, issued a statement calling for a mass student movement. That statement mirrored many of the demands that have been made by PSUSU such as disarming campus police, free college tuition, cancelation of student debt, a living wage for all campus workers, and an end to business model higher education.  Gazi spoke at today’s meeting echoing much of the sentiment in their open letter.

Students spoke at the meeting about racism, Islamophobia, and a growing concern about open white supremacy on campus,  as well the arming of campus security, poverty wages paid on campus, student hunger and houselessness, the cutting of arts programs, bloated administrative salaries and perks, and a host of other issues that the board has all but ignored student voices on for years.  Continue reading Students shut down PSU Board of Trustees meeting, demand $15 Now for all campus workers

15 Now PDX Disrupts, Walks Out of Minimum Wage Hearing

by Justin Norton-Kertson

On Monday dozens of supporters of a statewide $15 minimum wage marched through the state capitol building. They spent the morning going from office to office in large groups, talking to legislators and their staff about the importance of a statewide $15 minimum wage, and the importance of repealing the anti-worker, ALEC inspired preemption law that helps keep wages below the cost of living by preventing cities and counties from raising the minimum wage above the state level.

That afternoon, the Senate Workforce Committee held an informational hearing on raising Oregon’s minimum wage at which only one affected low-wage worker was given space to speak. The committee was greeted by a room full of low-wage workers and supporters in red 15 Now shirts. With about 40 15 Now supporters at the hearing, their presence dominated the room. At one point, all the $15 supporters were asked to stand to show their support, almost everyone in the room stood up except for the few business interests present.

Legislators heard about the various minimum wage campaigns and ballot initiatives underway, and also heard from business owners and others who support raising the minimum wage. A few business owners and lobbyists came to speak against raising the minimum wage.

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Speaking about the campaign to raise the statewide minimum wage to $15 per hour, Justin Norton-Kertson expressed skepticism that Democrats can come together and do the right thing for Oregon’s low-wage workers and their families. Republican state senator Knopp, illustrating Republican disdain for working class issues, stood up and walked out of the room in the middle of Norton-Kertson’s presentation.

“We did this back in April…and we all know how that turned out. Nothing, right? And we all know that the issue isn’t about Republicans versus Democrats. Democrats have majorities in both houses…it’s Democrats who can’t agree among themselves. So I’m left wondering what the point of this is. Why should we believe that this session, which is only a month long, will be any different than last session. And if we were to get any minimum wage increase what would the compromise be? Would it be high enough for places like Portland, Eugene, Hood River, Bend, Corvallis, and Ashland? Would it leave out farmworkers or bring in a tip credit?”

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Norton-Kertson also said that their lack of faith in Democrats is why a $15 ballot initiative was filed so early, and that if lawmakers won’t do the right thing, that they should at least refer both $15 and the repeal of Oregon’s minimum wage preemption law to the ballot so that voters can decide and do the right thing themselves.

Immediately after he finished speaking, 15 Now supporters stood up and mic checked the hearing, reiterating the call for a statewide $15 and the restoration of local control of minimum wage laws. In a call and response pattern, they asked why low-wage workers weren’t invited to speak at the hearing. They read off a long list of job types and industries in Oregon that pay less than $15 per hour, and then walked out of the hearing en masse chanting “$15 now and local control!”

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Because Black Lives Matter! $15 NOW!
For homecare workers! $15 NOW!
For childcare workers! $15 NOW!
For janitors! $15 NOW!
For single mothers! $15 NOW!
For food service workers! $15 NOW!
For security guards! $15 NOW!
For nursing home workers! $15 NOW!
For retail workers! $15 NOW!
For rural Oregon $15 NOW!
For college campus workers! $15 NOW!
For city workers! $15 NOW!
For social workers! $15 NOW!
For farm workers! $15 NOW!
For farm workers! $15 NOW!

Click Here to view the video stream of the hearing and the mic check.

New Seasons and Other Businesses Push for Higher Minimum Wage

New Seasons Market announced that it will raise the minimum starting wage at all of its stores to $12 per hour in January 2016, a $2 increase from their current base pay of $10 per hour. ¿Por Qué No? Taqueria in Portland also announced that they are raising their minimum wage to $12.50 in January 2016, and will increase that to $15 by 2021.

According to a press release sent out yesterday, New Seasons is working with a number of other businesses to call “for state elected leaders to take action in 2016 on a minimum wage policy that meets the needs of Oregon’s diverse communities.” Among those other businesses are Grand Central Bakery, HOTLIPS Pizza, Looptworks, Neil Kelly, ¿Por Qué No?, The Joinery, Better World Club, Morel Ink, Chef’s Table, FMYI, and Grain & Gristle.

New Season’s CEO Wendy Collie stated, “The wage that supports self-sufficiency in urban areas such as Portland could be $15 per hour, while the differences in cost of living in rural communities could make the same wage unsustainable.”

We applaud New Seasons and these other businesses for committing to raising wages, for actively supporting the work to change state policy on the minimum wage, and for recognizing the need for $15 in Portland.  However, while we agree that Oregon communities are diverse in terms of cost of living, we wish to emphasize that $15 is not just what is needed in Portland, but rather what is need throughout our entire state.

Continue reading New Seasons and Other Businesses Push for Higher Minimum Wage

Hundreds of Supporters Attend Hearing in Salem, 15 Now Oregon Announces Ballot Measure

by Justin Norton-Kertson

On Monday evening at the Oregon State Capitol Building in Salem, community groups, labor unions, low-wage workers, and activists from throughout the state flooded the committee hearing room and spilled into overflow rooms to express strong support for a bill that would raise Oregon’s minimum wage to $15 an hour over three years.

Click here to watch the hearing

Seattle and San Francisco both approved a minimum wage of $15 last year, and Oregon would be the first state to follow suit. At a press conference before the hearing, 15 Now Oregon representatives announced plans to file for a ballot measure this week, and to begin collecting signatures to qualify for the 2016 election.

Photo by Teresa Roberts
Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek with $15 supporters. Photo by Teresa Roberts

Supporters of a $15 minimum wage urged legislators to initiate a floor vote on SB 610, and expressed concern that big business lobbyists were working behind the scenes to kill the bill. Dozens wore red T-shirts while hundreds more wore green buttons, all emblazoned with the 15 Now Oregon logo.

Continue reading Hundreds of Supporters Attend Hearing in Salem, 15 Now Oregon Announces Ballot Measure

A $15 Minimum Wage Solves the Benefits Cliff Problem in Oregon

by Justin Norton-Kertson

The Oregonian’s recent article shed’s strange light on the Legislative Revenue Office (LRO) analysis of the effects of a minimum wage increase and the “benefits cliff.” The analysis looks at a single parent with two children who gets a childcare tax subsidy. It states that while at a $12 or $13 minimum wage these families fall off the benefits cliff (meaning they actually end up losing money each month after accounting for the public benefits they will lose as a result of having a higher income), a $15 minimum wage leaves these families with about $50 per month extra after accounting for the public assistance benefits lose.

The Oregonian’s article come with a massive, super-sized font headline about ONLY having $49 extra with $15 minimum wage, as if this is a reason to leave the minimum wage in Oregon at a poverty level. The article focuses entirely on the grossly hyperbolized notion that if the minimum wage goes up people will actually lose money.

The article misses the real point entirely, it fails to come to the glaringly obvious conclusion that a $15 minimum actually solves the benefits cliff problem. It puts people on top of the cliff, while anything less leaves families falling off the cliff. With a $15 minimum wage working people in Oregon will have the dignity of being able to provide adequate housing, food, and health insurance for their families without having to rely on taxpayers for assistance. It even leaves these families with a little left over at the end of the month. This is important, because working people deserve dignity. No one who works should live in poverty.

The University of Oregon’s Labor Education and Research Center (LERC) just released a report addressing this exactly issue of Oregonians on public assistance. The report shows that taxpayers in Oregon spend over $1.7 billion per year to subsidize the poverty wages of massively profitable corporations by paying for the public assistance that goes to those corporations’ low-wage workers. Raising the minimum wage to $15/hr will reduce the amount that taxpayers are spending to corporate low wages. We can then use that freed up money to fund public education, or provide affordable housing, or help fund single payer healthcare for all Oregonians.

The LERC report also found that 400,000 workers in our state currently work in low-wage jobs, and that 197,000 of them received public assistance. That means that there are hundreds of thousands of working Oregonians who make less than $15/hr and DID NOT receive public assistance. They would benefit directly from an increase in wages. For these workers the benefits cliff does not exist. They will have much more than $49 extra at the end of the month when we increase the minimum wage $15/hr. 

What the LRO report shows is that $15 is the right number for Oregon’s minimum wage. Families can’t survive on $9.25. A $12 or $13 minimum wage is still a poverty wage here in our state, and would leave families falling off the benefits cliff. Only a $15 minimum wage is enough to prevent families from falling off the cliff while giving working Oregonians the dignity of earning a wage that allows them to provide for their families. Oregon needs a raise. Oregon needs $15 Now.

Help us win $15 for Oregon by donating to the campaign or becoming a volunteer!